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Boston Red Sox Draft Review

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More American League East, with a look at the Boston Red Sox.

 Boston Red Sox Draft Review
1) Kolbrin Vitek, 2B, Ball State University: I like the bat a lot, but I'm not sure where he will fit defensively. My guess is that he ends up in the outfield in the long run, but I'd give him a chance to prove me wrong in the infield first. I think this is a solid choice, though not a spectacular one.

1S) Bryce Brentz, OF, Middle Tennessee State University: Was expected to go somewhat higher than this. Excellent power potential, though track record is inconsistent and he strikes out a lot. Still, this is a fine choice in the supplemental round, especially in a draft class relatively thin in college impact bats.

1S) Anthony Ranaudo, RHP, Louisiana State University: If he's healthy and gets his 2009 form back, this is a terrific pick. However, I expressed skepticism about his health a year ago, and despite his late-spring rebound, I worry that his peak might have been last year. Still, I was wrong about Kyle Gibson and I could be wrong about this, too.

2) Brandon Workman, RHP, University of Texas: Sort of the pitching version of Brentz: he could have been a first rounder and is great value in this spot, although he's making noises about wanting first round money and going back to school if he doesn't get it. Workman's fastball/curveball combination is potent, and he made improvements with his control and mechanical consistency this spring.

3) Sean Coyle, SS, Pennsylvania HS: Small guy at 5-8 and will have to be bought out of North Carolina, but he's athletic, fast, and has some pop in his bat. I think he was overdrafted by a round or two, but that's just my opinion. Great makeup by all accounts.

4) Garin Cecchini, SS, Louisiana HS: Could have been a first-rounder if not for a knee injury and LSU commitment. Projected to hit for both average and power, and the Red Sox have been able to sign other players in past drafts for overslot bonuses.

5) Henry Ramos, OF, Puerto Rico HS: Young right field type, with power and a good throwing arm, but rather raw and will need plenty of development work.

6) Kendrick Perkins, OF, Texas HS: Another raw athlete, runs well, excellent power potential, but struggles with plate discipline. Better-known as a football guy and has a scholarship to Texas A&M, but reportedly wants to play baseball in the long run.

7) Chris Hernandez, LHP, University of Miami-Florida: Fastball is below average in the mid-80s, but he has excellent control, changes speeds well, and knows how to pitch.

8) Mathew Price, RHP, Virginia Tech: Live arm, can hit 94 MPH, decent changeup but other secondary pitches need work. Somewhat raw for a college guy, but could end up being very good. Probably a reliever in the long run.

9) Tyler Barnette,RHP, North Carolina HS: 6-2, 180 pound right-hander, throws in the upper-80s, might pick up a bit more velocity but probably not a huge amount given his size. Throws strikes, breaking ball needs some work.

10) Jacob Dahlstrand, RHP, Texas HS: Big guy at 6-5, 205, hits 90 and could get faster, raw mechanics, but considerable potential. I like him better than Barnette at this point.

FIVE OTHERS OF NOTE: 13-Keith Couch, RHP, Adelphi; 15-Steve Wilkerson, SS, Georgia HS; 16-Adam Duke, RHP, Utah HS; 19-Eric Jaffe, RHP, California HS; 20-Roderick Shoulders, C-1B, Florida HS

COMMENT: I usually like Red Sox drafts, and this one is no exception. Vitek, Brentz, Ranaudo, Workman, and Cecchini are all first-round talents when things are going well, and that's a real coup to snare them all, assuming they sign. Coyle is a good player. Ramos and Perkins are raw, but in some draft classes they could have gone as high as the second round given their tools. Two college arms and two high school arms finish out the top ten rounds, providing diversity, and there are a variety of interesting signability picks after that. Boston has the financial resources to make this strategy work. All in all, I think this is a great class.