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Baseball Prospect Archetypes

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Carl Jung
Carl Jung

In my non-baseball life I've been reading about psychologist Carl Jung and his concept of archetypes. To quote Jung, an archetype "is a tendency to form such representations of a motif - representations that can vary a great deal in detail without losing their basic pattern." There are an unlimited number of archetypes knocking around in our minds, but common ones according to Jung include ideas such as Mother, Father, Devil, Wise Man, Old Woman, Child, Trickster, Hero, etc.

This works in baseball, too. "Control Pitcher" is an archetype. If I say that Prospect X is a Control Pitcher, but tell you nothing else about him, your mind can still draw a mental image of certain aspects that Prospect X must possess in order to fall into the archetypical domain of Control Pitcher. Most players contain elements of two or more archetypes, just as our own minds and personalities do.

What I want to do here is involve the Minor League Ball community in making a list of baseball player archetypes. Here are five. Let's see how many more you can come up with. The ideal archetype can be expressed in no more than two or three words.

Common Baseball Player Archetypes.
Control Pitcher
Power Hitter
Five Tool Player
Leadoff Man
Utility Infielder