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Rookie Review: Josh Edgin, LHP, New York Mets

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July 24, 2012; New York, NY, USA; New York Mets pitcher Josh Edgin (66) throws a pitch during the eighth inning of a game against the Washington Nationals at Citi Field. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-US PRESSWIRE
July 24, 2012; New York, NY, USA; New York Mets pitcher Josh Edgin (66) throws a pitch during the eighth inning of a game against the Washington Nationals at Citi Field. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-US PRESSWIRE

Rookie Review: Josh Edgin, LHP, New York Mets

The New York Mets have gotten some solid bullpen work this summer from rookie reliever Josh Edgin. He wasn't a hot prospect pre-season, but has fanned 22 in his first 14 major league innings. His ERA is 5.14, but his components are much better, resulting in an FIP of 3.31 and an xFIP of 2.71. He's topped out at 96 MPH and looks like he can be a useful reliever going forward, so let's figure out where he came from.


Edgin was a college pitcher at Ohio State University. He had a decent arm but wasn't especially successful, posting a 6.18 ERA with 56 hits allowed in 44 innings as a freshman in 2007, then a 6.75 ERA with a 40/25 K/BB and 32 hits allowed in 32 innings as a sophomore. He transferred to Francis Marion, a Division II program, and did enough there to earn a call in the 30th round of the 2010 draft. He went 6-4, 4.07 with a 65/22 K/BB in 84 innings with 96 hits allowed, not great, but scouts saw arm strength.

Edgin began his pro career with a 2.84 ERA and a 41/12 K/BB in 32 innings for Kingsport in the Appalachian League, which was better than he'd ever performed in college. He pitched in A-ball last year and was lights-out, posting a 1.50 ERA with a 76/23 K/BB in 66 innings, 44 hits allowed with a 2.16 GO/AO between Low-A Savannah and High-A St. Lucie, collecting 27 saves.

In 2012 he posted a 3.53 ERA with a 45/20 K/BB and 1.13 GO/AO in 43 innings between Double-A Binghamton and Triple-A Buffalo, before slotting into the major league bullpen.

Edgin has plenty of arm strength, topping out at 96 and running his fastball consistently in the low-90s. His slider is an effective second pitch, and in the bullpen he doesn't have to worry much about using a changeup. He has a future (and a present of course) as a LOOGY (at least), as long as his command stays solid.

Overall, this was a nice bit of drafting and scouting by the Mets and scout Marlin McPhail, picking up a major league bullpen arm for a $2,000 bonus and a 30th round pick from a small college.

A good organization never wastes a draft pick.