clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

3.100 Detroit Tigers - Rob Brantly, C, UC Riverside

The Tigers spent the 100th overall pick on Rob Brantly.

Follow the jump for his pre-draft report.

Robert Brantly   Position: C   School: UC Riverside   State: CA   Year: So.   Height: 6’2’’   Weight: 190

Bats: L   Throws: R   Birth Date: 7/14/89   Seiler Rating: 1B1   Last Drafted: 2008 (WAS-46)

 

Year

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

SB

CS

BB

SO

AVG

OBP

SLG

2009

42

152

25

48

9

0

4

23

0

0

7

17

.316

.350

.454

2010

54

209

50

78

18

1

7

39

0

1

23

24

.373

.447

.569


Rob Brantly is a catcher at UC Riverside in Southern California. Originally from Chaparral High School in Scottsdale, Arizona, the same high school that fellow Draft Notebook prospect Adam Bailey of Nebraska attended, Brantly is one of the best draft-eligible sophomores in the 2010 draft class. A forty-sixth round draft pick of the Nationals out of high school, Brantly was on the scouting scene at a more minor level until a big summer in the Northwoods League in 2009, when he led the league in hitting. Featuring a sweet swing from the left side that projects for an above-average to plus hit tool, Brantly also packs a punch, featuring average raw power with perhaps a chance for more. The comparisons to Joe Mauer run a little wild, but Brantly is somewhat close in terms of having the best true lefty swing in this class. He’s also a selective hitter with a good ability to put the bat on the ball, and transitioning to the pros offensively shouldn’t be a major problem. On the defensive side, however, there are plenty of arguments over his long-term value. Most scouts will argue that a catcher needs an above-average arm at the least to be an average Major League catcher, and Brantly doesn’t have that. His arm gets average grades, and while he’s average or above on every other catching category, he’ll have an uphill battle to start at the next level. However, his bat makes him a strong second to fourth round candidate, with a high ceiling as a first division starting catcher. His signability as a sophomore may hinder his draft status, but he wouldn’t have much to gain by returning to school if he is indeed drafted that high.